Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Petroleum Engineering Crowne Plaza, Heathrow, London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Bjørn Kvamme

University of Bergen, Norway

Keynote: Impact of solid surface adsorption on hydrate formation risk evaluation

Time : 09:30-10:05

OMICS International Petroleum Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bjørn Kvamme photo
Biography:

Bjørn Kvamme obtained his MSc in Chemical Engineering (1981) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (1984) from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Sciences. After a short period with SINTEF and two years at Bergen University College, he was appointed to full Professor in 1987 and started education of MSc and PhD in Process Technology in Telemark. He entered a position as Professor in Gas Processing at Department of Physics, University of Bergen in March 2000. He is the author/co-author of 373 publications, of which 140 are in high quality journals.

Abstract:

Hydrocarbons being transported in pipelines will always contain some dissolved water. High pressures and low temperature involves a risk of hydrate (ice-like crystals contain up to 14% CH4) formation. The traditional way to calculate the risk of hydrate formation and the corresponding level of water content that can be permitted before transport has been to calculate water dew-point and the checking if presence of liquid water would lead to hydrate formation at the conditions of temperatures and pressures at these conditions. Pipelines being used for hydrocarbon are, however, normally covered by rust even before they are placed out. One of the most stable iron oxide in rust is Fe2O3. This mineral is a very good adsorption material for water and will as such represent another route for the water to drop out from hydrocarbon mixtures. The chemical potential of water adsorbed on rust can be 3.4 kJ/mole lower than chemical potential of liquid water at relevant conditions. In this study we have examined maximum water content which can be permitted in mixtures of CH4 and C2H6 when considering adsorption drop out versus drop out as liquid water. For CH4 contacting water the tolerance limit based on liquid water drop out is found to be in the order of 26 times higher than corresponding limit based on rust adsorption, for temperature 275 K and pressures between 50 and 250 bars. Similar ratios are also found for pure C2H6 and a mixture of CH4 with 20% C2H6. As a consequence the hydrate risk analysis needs to be revised in order to reflect the most preferred routes for water drop out from gas.

Keynote Forum

Mansurov Z A

Institute of Combustion Problems–Ministry of Education and Science, Kazakhstan

Keynote: Aquatic oil spill elimination by burning

Time : 10:05-10:40

OMICS International Petroleum Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mansurov Z A photo
Biography:

Mansurov Z A is a General Director of the Institute of Combustion Problems of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan. His scientific activity includes study and investigations of kinetics and mechanisms of hydrocarbon combustion and structure of cool soothing flames. In 2002, group of scientists headed by him had received Diploma for discovery of phenomenon of low-temperature cool-flame soot formation awarded by Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. Her professional career includes longstanding activity in INTAS. He is Editor-in-Chief of Combustion and Plasmochemistry and Eurasian Chemico-Technological Journals indexed at Scopus. 

Abstract:

Emergency oil spills during transportation of them by water way, from offshore oil drilling rigs and other sources can rapidly result in harm to the ecosystem and leads to negative and social impact. The development of effective methods on oil spill elimination is a task of singular importance. Burning can be used where other methods are not effective spill response, and can be done in parallel with other methods of spill after determining an appropriate method for a particular site or geographic region. The paper provides an overview of the current state of the problem, and research results on combustion of Karazhanbas and Tengiz oil on water surface were carried out. It has been established that minimum thickness of oil blanket, allowing to initiate and support combustion process, lie in the range of 3-5 mm. For ignition and maintenance of stable combustion of oil on water surface, the synthetic sorbent was suggested. It is found that, the synthetic sorbent accelerates the combustion process of oil on water surface threefold in comparison with combustion process of oil without sorbent. It is shown that the remaining mass of oil on water surface after combustion process termination, presents the bitumen substance, having a good adherence and strong adhesion that allows taking it with high efficiency by mechanical method.

Keynote Forum

Akkihebbal K Suresh

Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, India

Keynote: Heterogeneous catalysis of complex reaction systems: Case studies from petrochemicals

Time : 10:40-11:15

OMICS International Petroleum Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Akkihebbal K Suresh photo
Biography:

Akkihebbal K Suresh completed his PhD from Monash University. After a brief stint with Hindustan Lever Research Centre (a Unilever company), he joined the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 1988 and has been with the Institute ever since. He currently holds an Institute Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering. He served as the Head of the department from 2005-2008, and as the Dean of Faculty Affairs of IIT Bombay during 2009-2014. Apart from an abiding interest in liquid phase hydrocarbon oxidations, his work encompasses other themes in transport and reaction engineering. He is a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering.

Abstract:

There are many processes in the general petrochemicals and petroleum processing arena which are characterized by a complex network of reactions, and hence a complex reaction mixture which presents challenges for product workup. While in principle, catalysis presents a possible solution to reduce the complexity of such reactions via a selective promotion of the desired steps in the network, development of appropriate catalysts remains very much an art to this day, if one that is informed by a wealth of experience and some theoretical developments. In this task, we shall discuss some case studies from the petrochemicals and related areas such as biodiesel and automotive catalysis, to illustrate both the possibilities as well as the challenges. Each case study illustrates a separate set of issues. Among the challenges illustrated will be (a) that of selectivity (b) the role of catalyst support (c) synergistic behaviour when catalysts are combined, (d) catalyst activation and deactivation.

Break: Group Photo
Coffee Break: 11:15-11:30 @Foyer
  • Advances in Petroleum Engineering | Fuels and Refining | Petroleum Geology | Exploration, Production and Storage | Reservoir Engineering
Location: Training room-4
Speaker

Chair

Bjorn Kvamme

University of Bergen, Norway

Speaker
Biography:

Karima Ben Tayeb has completed his PhD from Lille University and Post-doctoral studies from Poitiers University. His field of competence in the application of EPR spectroscopy in the catalysis domain.

Abstract:

The increasing demand for petroleum products will require the production and the upgrading of heavy and extra-heavy oils. Hence, the petroleum industry is confronted with many issues in production, transportation, and refining. Indeed, petroleum residues are complex mixtures of high molecular weight compounds containing high amounts of impurities such as sulfur, nitrogen and metallic species. These elements need to be removed in hydro-processing units through hydro­desulfuration, hydro-denitrogenation and hydro-demetallation reactions before these oil fractions can be used. The most abundant metals in heavy feedstocks, vanadium and nickel, are mainly concentrated in the asphaltenes fraction, a petroleum fraction which precipitates in presence of paraffinic solvents. Characterization of vanadium and nickel complexes is therefore important to the development of demetallation and conversion strategies used to process heavy crudes. The dependence of vanadyl structures on the geographic origin of feedstocks and their evolution during hydroprocessing in an ebullated-bed pilot unit were studied. The aim of this contribution is to assess the possibilities of the EPR spectroscopy to provide information on the structure of the vanadyl species. Two Venezuelan Straight Run Vacuum Residues (SR VR), and one Russian SR VR, were hydroconverted at 410°C in an ebullated-bed pilot plant. By comparing the spectrum of VOTPP (vanadyl tetraphenyl porphyrin) reference with those of C7 asphaltenes, it seems that nitrogen ridges are composed of two types of signatures which are attributed to nitrogens chelating the vanadium or are very close: one of them corresponds to nitrogen nuclei that are very close to the signal of the VOTPP nitrogen (noted N1), but the other one has not been attributed (noted N2).This work shows that pulsed EPR spectroscopy is a powerful technique that allows to distinguish several types of environments of vanadium species, amongst which are porphyrinic ligands, even in very complex samples such as C7 asphaltenes from heavy feedstocks. It was shown that the relative proportions of vanadium species vary from one feed to another depending on its geological origin, and that the porphyrinic species in asphaltenes from hydroconverted effluents are more refractory to conversion. It will be very interesting to characterize more hydroconverted effluents to confirm the refractory character of porphyrinic species and to see whether pulsed EPR is able to follow the evolution of the second coordination sphere to better understand the mechanisms of hydrodemetallization.

Zhengwei Ma

China University of Petroleum, China

Title: The development of oil and gas industry in “The Belt and Road” initiative

Time : 12:00-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Zhengwei Ma is Assistant Professor of Finance and Energy management in the School of Business Administration of China University of Petroleum (Beijing). He obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Canada. He obtained his Master’s and Doctor’s degrees in USA. He acquired his Doctor degree from Northwestern Polytechnic University in California, USA. His research interests are in Finance and Energy Management. He participated in six foundation research programs and published 15 papers in last three years.

Abstract:

“The Belt and Road”, which means “the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road”, was put forward by Chairman Xi Jinping. It is a significant breakthrough to develop the theory and practice of opening to the outside world in China. Accelerating the development of oil and gas industry is one of the important contents of “the Belt and Road” initiative. It intends to promote the trade with countries along “the Belt and Road”, increase investments and improve the degree of Chinese energy security. This paper tends to explore the opportunities and challenges that oil and gas industry has been facing by analyzing the backgrounds, influences and risks of oil and gas industry development in “the Belt and Road” initiative, and then provide countermeasures for the development of oil and gas industry in China and countries along “the Belt and Road”.

Yunsheng Wei

Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development, China

Title: Progress and achievements of shale gas development in CNPC

Time : 12:30-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Yunsheng Wei began his professional career at RIPED in 2006, having abundant experience in unconventional gas development nearly 10 years. He has made great contributions to improving reservoir engineering, especially in tight gas and shale gas. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several gas  engineering journals.

Abstract:

In past 5 years, CNPC has made great breakthrough of shale gas exploration and development in Sichuan Basin. Both proved reserves and production rate has been growing rapidly. This is achieved by the advance and innovation of technology and management.

a) Geology and geophysics technologies ensure the reliability of resource evaluation and production target. It is realized by acquiring, processing and interpreting geophysical data to obtain the stratigraphy correlation, sweet spot distribution, key geology & geomechanics factor determination.

b) Drilling and completion technologies provide the early return of the investment. CNPC has explored the best practice of integrated technology (including fasting drilling, volume fracturing treatment), to obtain higher initial production rate (over 6.4×104 m3/d per well in Changning and Weiyuan plays).

c) Reservoir engineering technology ensures the long-term sustained production. Gas well classification is developed to perform integrated management of numerous production wells; production performance evaluation is developed to estimate OGIP and EUR (average OGIP per well is 1×108m3, EUR is 7.6×107m3/d); fracturing parameter optimization is developed to enhance productivity and benefits.

By conducting these pilot research since 2012, CNPC has established complete technique series for the development of shale resource buried less than 3500m, and gained great confidence from accomplishing production from shale.

While CNPC has made great progress towards commercial production, low gas price and high investment are expected to be growing challenges in the way ahead for shale gas. CNPC would realize cost-effective production at low gas price by sustained improvement and innovation of technique.

Break: Lunch Break: 13:00-14:00 @Orwelll’s Brasserie
Speaker
Biography:

Taufan Marhaendrajana obtained his PhD degree from Texas A&M University and currently he is Head of Graduate Study Program of Petroleum Engineering at Institute Technology Bandung.

Abstract:

Small scaled surfactant flooding test was implemented field at Tanjung Field. Zone A reservoir selected for this test has estimated IOIP at 193.7 MMSTB. The current recovery factor is 16.3%. This field had been produced since 1961 under primary depletion until 1989. At 1990 pilot waterflood was started and since 1995, this field has been undergoing full scaled water injection until today using peripheral pattern. Zone A is a very tight conglomeratic sandstone layer that has effective porosity (f) of 21%, average initial water saturation of 35%, and permeability (k) of tens to hundreds md. The oil gravity is 40°API, wax content is 36%, dead oil viscosity (mo) is 7.9 cP (live oil viscosity is 1.14 cp), initial reservoir is 1600 psi, bubble point pressure is 1357 psi and reservoir temperature is 150oF. A type of Alkyl Carboxy Etoxylate surfactant was used and was formulated further suited to oil and characteristic of reservoir. This formulation was optimized using salinity scan method and addition of co-solvent to obtain Type III phase behaviour and low IFT of 10-2 mN/m (initial oil-brine IFT was 18.3 mN/m). It was stable up to 150oF for three month. Core flooding experiment was conducted using native core, brine and oil. After saturation of core to established initial water and oil saturation, brine was injected until 100% water cut followed by slug of 0.2 PV surfactant solution (2% w/w concentration) then by water injection. Incremental oil recovery was 25%. Small scaled field testing was conducted by selecting pair of injector-producer that was at close distance and has good connectivity between them. The primary objective is to confirm the surfactant performance at the field. The response should be quick enough and be cost efficient to enable further review. The injection pattern was a line drive like with target reservoir pore volume is 10,625 bbl. Total cost of this test was only USD 61,812 (include chemical and operational costs) and oil production was increase up to three times. This surfactant flooding test is started at 18th of January, 2016 and injected continuously for four days followed by water injection. First oil production gain was recorded after surfactant slug was completed and it has been maintained until 22nd of June, 2016 and counting. Incremental recovery of this small scaled testing is 72.4%.

Mansurov Z A

Institute of Combustion Problems–Ministry of Education and Science, Kazakhstan

Title: Study and processing of oil sands

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mansurov Z A is a General Director of the Institute of Combustion Problems of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan. His scientific activity includes study and investigations of kinetics and mechanisms of hydrocarbon combustion and structure of cool soothing flames. In 2002, group of scientists headed by him had received Diploma for discovery of phenomenon of low-temperature cool-flame soot formation awarded by Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. Her professional career includes longstanding activity in INTAS. He is Editor-in-Chief of Combustion and Plasmochemistry and Eurasian Chemico-Technological Journals indexed at Scopus.

Abstract:

Huge deposits of oil sands (OS) of Republic of Kazakhstan which are characterized by content of organic part that ranges from 9 to 95% according to type and depth of each deposit are a prime candidate as an alternative source of hydrocarbons. It is notable that we can obtain organic products with various physical and chemical properties depending on the method of processing of OS. In connection with the above, in the Laboratory of Oxidation Processes of Hydrocarbon raw of Institute of Combustion Problems (ICP) the development of following main directions of processing of OS in order to produce commercial oil products is carried. Extraction of organic part of OS of Kazakhstan deposits using different organic solvents with subsequent oxidizing it to bitumen that is used for road construction. Thermal processing of OS of Kazakhstan deposits with obtaining of synthetic oils as well as hydrophobic mineral part. Ultrasonic method for separation of organic and mineral parts of OS, solutions of alkaline metals serve as surfactants. Along with development of methods of OS processing a great attention is paid to improve the physic & chemical characteristics of road bitumen by creation of its composite with rubber crumb, as well as a problem of recycling of rubber pollutants and wastes is solved. An important aspect of ICP research is ecology of oil and gas industry. It is carried research in area of bio-remediation of oil-contaminated soils using bacteria.

Speaker
Biography:

Bjørn Kvamme obtained his MSc in Chemical Engineering (1981) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (1984) from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Sciences. After a short period with SINTEF and two years at Bergen University College, he was appointed to full Professor in 1987 and started education of MSc and PhD in Process Technology in Telemark. He entered a position as Professor in Gas Processing at Department of Physics, University of Bergen in March 2000. He is the author/coauthor of 373 publications, of which 140 are in high quality journals.

Abstract:

The total global energy of CH4 trapped in crystalline form as hydrates is huge and may exceed twice the amount of energy of known sources of conventional fossil fuels. Most of the natural gas hydrates found in nature are from biological degradation of organic material in the upper few hundred meters and correspondingly high purity of CH4. These hydrates forms structure I hydrate, which contains a ratio of 1:3 of small to large cavities. The small cavity is very well stabilized by CH4 while CO2 fits the largest cavity better, and the water is having stronger short range interactions with CO2 than CH4. CO2 gas or liquid that is brought in contact with CH4 hydrate will therefore replace the CH4 in most of the large cavities. This is possible through two mechanisms, a solid state direct conversion and a second mechanism in which CO2 form a new hydrate with free pore water. The released heat from this hydrate formation assists in dissociating the in situ CH4 hydrate. Substantial amounts of N2 (often as high as 80% by volume) is proposed as one solution for reduced hydrate plugging and increased gas permeability. In this study we examine the minimum limits of CO2 content for ability to form new hydrate from liquid water and injected gas, and also how this changes with small impurities of H2S. It is found that even as small amounts of H2S as 1% can substantially increase the ability of injection gas to form new hydrate, as compared to same mixture without H2S.

Break: Coffee Break: 15:30-15:45 @Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Cristina M Quintella has obtained her DPh in 1993 from University of Sussex. She is full Professor at UFBA, President of FORTEC, has won 5 technology prizes from Petrobras, published more than 80 papers, 20 chapters or books, has created the journal Cadernos de Prospecção, coordinates the Northeast of Brazil TTO Network. She does technology forecast for several companies and is the Academic Coordinator of PROFNIT (a Brazilian Master’s degree with over 100 professors on intellectual property and technology transfer for innovation).

Abstract:

The exploitation and production technologies of shale gas and its regulatory aspects are discussed, focusing on analysis for decision-makers. The data collected comprehended technology assessment through patent applications, scientific research evaluation through articles, regulatory aspects and accidents. This work maps countries, authors and journals with more articles, and companies with more patent applications. Several relationships and networks are discussed: Between authors and articles, among the main themes of articles, among countries with articles, and among 37 International Patent Classification codes. The environmental legislation is discussed for 9 countries and over 20 states, yielding regulatory analysis in several countries and in Brazil. A risk map is presented showing the geographic distribution of accidents. The main themes found are health, water, pollutant emission, regulations and policies, economic aspects, environmental impacts, risk and shale gas characteristics. It was found that there are few alternative technologies to hydraulic fracturing, being the research efforts more concentrated on mitigation technologies. United States and China are the countries with greater scientific and technological production as these countries possess large reserves of this resource and great interest in expanding their scale of operation and commercialization of this raw material, as well as export technologies. This work points several items of technical and sociological assessments of the production of shale gas, highlighting the need for better technical evaluation and better structuring the regulatory aspects, aiming to the possible exploitation of shale gas on large scale in Brazil.

Arunima Saxena

S V National Institute of Technology, India

Title: Flow assurance in pipelines - Dealing with non-Newtonian fluids

Time : 16:15-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Arunima Saxena is in the final year of undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering from S V National Institute of Technology, India. She is a propective PhD candidate. She has been awarded Mitacs Globalink and Indian Academy of Sciences scholarship.

Abstract:

In this study, rheological properties of heavy crude oil from mature fields of India are premeditated. Effects of pressure and shear on viscosity followed by viscoelastic properties such as gelation point, crossover amplitude, and crossover frequency are profoundly studied by carrying out constant shear, frequency, strain and temperature sweep experiments on High Pressure Anton Paar Rheometer. Gelation temperature apprises about the ambient temperature to maintain inside the pipelines for flow assurance i.e. just above the gelation point so as to avoid the formation of wax/gel which can lead to blockage of pipe and even shut down in extreme conditions. Storage and Loss modulus are stress responses for a viscoelastic fluid under oscillatory shear. Important feature of temperature vs. G’ and G” is the crossover point, which is the temperature at which G’ and G” intersect (in case of reactive media) or there is a sudden increase in the value of G’ (in the case of non-reactive media). At crossover point gel formation takes place and with further decrease in temperature the microstructure tends towards a solid structure. While as temperature increases from crossover temperature,G">G' this is the instant when the applied mechanical force surpasses the inter-molecular forces and the material starts to flow. Viscoelastic measurements characterizes material similar to optical spectrum, UV & IR Radiation having the advantage over latter of very less sample requirement and satisfactory results acquired in small deformations.

V S Staroseltsev

Siberian Research Institute of Geology, Russia

Title: Tectonic conditionality of abundantly oil-bearing lower cretaceous clinoforms of Western Siberia

Time : 16:40-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

V S Staroseltsev defended his PhD thesis in 1965, DSc thesis in 1982 and received the title of Professor in 1989. He is the Scientific Director of JSC SNIIGGiMS in Regional and Petroleum Geology, teaches at the Novosibirsk State University (Geological and Geophysical Faculty). He has published about 400 scientific papers in the field of tectonics, oil and ore geology, including articles and monographs. He is the Senior Associate Editor of the Journal, Geology and Mineral Resources of Siberia.

Abstract:

West Siberian Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary basin developed as a huge syneclise, including (in the north-east) Yenisei-Khatanga regional trough within the ancient Siberian platform. In the lower part, the Cretaceous deposits of Western Siberia clinoforms are widely developed. In the 70s of the twentieth century, A A Naumov connected them with the nature of filling the sedimentation basin. In 1988, T F Kalmykov explained the formation of the inclined reflecting areas by tangential stresses during passage of this huge syneclise through the chord of earth’s ellipsoid. Possibly clinoforms were created due to the pressure of Taimyr folded zones on margin of the Siberian platform. In support of the tectonic conditioning of Lower Cretaceous clinoforms, there is evidence by clear manifestation of them on the western slopes of the numerous uplifts within the eastern part of the West Siberian basin. The amplitude of these uplifts is saved from Pre-Neocomian horizons to the roof of Neocomian that indicates their later formation. Explanation of conditions for the formation of Lower Cretaceous clinoforms ("oblique packs") in Western Siberia is essential for the prediction of their abundant oil content. When consedimentational genesis oblique lens of sandy rocks, potential reservoirs, are isolated in the argillite-siltstone matrix that make problematic filling with oil for them. When they are formed by the action of tectonic stress there created the conditions for slippage of different lithology lens on surfaces of disruption, which may be further used as hydrocarbon migration paths.

Speaker
Biography:

Effie Marcoulaki is a Primary Researcher at the National Centre for Scientific Research DEMOKRITOS since 2008. She holds an MEng in Chemical Engineering from NTU Athens, and MSc and PhD in Industrial Process Integration from the University of Manchester. Her research activities include quantitative risk assessment, uncertainty evaluation, and development of optimization tools for industrial applications. Her research has been funded by the EC, and the Greek, UK and USA governments. She serves as expert evaluator for EC grant proposals, has over 50 publications in international peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and over 550 citations at Google Scholar.

Abstract:

In several publications since 2012, Marcoulaki and co-workers developed a systematic optimization framework for the basic design of main pipeline systems used for the transportation of fluids, like natural gas, petroleum or water. This presentation demonstrates the established optimization framework on real scale problems. The selected application involves the design of the Burgas-Alexandoupolis pipeline. The project has been under consideration since the 90’s, as an overland route for transporting crude oil from Russia and other countries of the Caspian region to the European markets and a trilateral agreement on the construction of the pipeline was signed between Bulgaria, Greece and Russia on 15 March 2007. The project was frozen in 2011 due to concerns for environmental and safety risks, but interest on the project was recently revived in view of increases in the capacity of the CPC. In our approach, the design problem is formulated mathematically and treated with advanced optimization techniques to derive optimal network structures and pipeline operation strategies, according to given fluid supply/demand, flowrate and location data, hydraulic equations, equipment cost, reliability, operation and maintenance features, and information on the landscape features and land use. We consider geographic data, including DEM’s, the location of SEVESO installations and geological fault lines, as well as the network of cities and roads, lakes and rivers, sites of environmental interest, etc. The solutions generated by our tool conform to various constraints, addressing safety, environmental and political issues, and compares favourably to the design proposed by the TBP Company.

Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Shipulin Vladimirovich have graduated from the Leningrad mining institute in 1976. He worked as the head of the laboratory and the teacher in mining institute for 30 years. He was a Candidate of Technical Sciences had received degree in 1994. He was the full member of the International power academy since 2000. He directed the company on repair of oil wells for 12 years. He has published 130 scientific works, 3 books and had taken out 92 patents for inventions. Currently he is an individual businessman-researcher and perform some works together with National Mineral resources university.

Abstract:

The most effective ways of processing of a well – hydraulic fracturing, torpedoing, chemical processing are most expensive, ecologically dangerous technologies. In most cases creation of long cracks of hydraulic fracturing is unprofitable – gives low effect and leads to flood.

I suggest to apply the pulsing hydraulic fracturing pressure to creation of a network of short cracks.

1. It is economic, the constant high pressure isn't required, powerful pump units aren't used, the technology of multistage hydraulic fracturing isn't applied, a large number of people and equipment isn't required.

2. Cracks extend in all directions, inflow of oil is carried out from all directions.

3. On it is required to fix cracks by a proppant. After repeated processing aren't closed by pressure of a crack yes of the end.

4. The chemical reactants which are negatively influencing ecology aren't applied.

5. Application for extraction of slate oil and gas is especially effective.

Example. The technology of pulse and wave processing for delivery wells which I developed is repeatedly tested on crafts of the Volga region, Kazakhstan and China. For work hoisting works aren't used, 2 cars are used, work is carried out by 2 persons. The technology is successfully applied.

Together with National Mineral resources university work on creation of hydraulic fracturing in coal layers for preliminary removal of methane is carried out.

The pulse and wave technology of creation of cracks for the extracting oil and gas wells passes tests, in the industry isn't applied yet.

  • Panel Discussion